As a boss, it is easy to blame employees who don’t perform at the desired level.  In a sense, it is also relatively easy to help them and offer solution.

It is much harder to deal with boss that do not provide the appropriate leadership and do not believe in their team.  They can put all the blame on their team, and abuse of their position to protect themselves from any criticism.  Because of their rank, they are always in a position to abuse of logic and ensure only the employees get the blame. And if they are hard worker and perfectionist, then it can even create a perfect storm…

Does that change the fact that the boss can be the source of some problems?  No.  Absolutely not.  Facts do not need to be admitted to exist.

If management create an expectation of perfection for their team members, can they really guarantee that they are perfect.  Actually, anybody who think he is perfect suffers from some level of arrogance and disconnection from reality.

I do believe in aiming for the highest quality possible, but at some point, it is also time to let it go and appreciate the results.

So as this article says:

“employee will leave because of their boss.”

Other very interesting observations:

No matter how good a company is, people will leave because of their boss.

 

Some people have a better knack at delegating successfully, and some are better rolling their sleeves up and being a worker along with everyone else. Some people are perfectionists and have a hard time letting go.

 

In the end, as Mr. Mike Dubyak says, it is very important to learn to delegate.  And that means letting others do it their way, sometimes fail, and learn from it.  I would even say that then you will most likely also benefit from great ideas that they can bring to you.

 

Believe in others and be a great leader.

WEX Inc. CEO: ‘Workers Will Leave Because of their Boss’

January 8, 2013, 2:28 PM

How do executives stay organized? What are their management strategies? And what do they do for fun? Executive Suite seeks answers to the behind-the-scenes questions.

Mike Dubyak

Age: 62

CEO of WEX Inc.

CEO since 1998

WSJ: Employee turnover was high when you took over. How have you slowed it down?

 Read full article on Wall Street Journal.